Day 2.2: Khufu’s Solar Barge

Khufu’s boat This was the first of my “must see” attractions that wasn’t included in the original itinerary. It cost very little for entry but a relative fortune for the privilege of taking photographs whilst

Khufu’s boat

This was the first of my “must see” attractions that wasn’t included in the original itinerary. It cost very little for entry but a relative fortune for the privilege of taking photographs whilst inside. (~£6gbp to get in ~£15gbp to take photos).

Feel free to dwell a little longer on these pics 😉

At the entrance, we had to cover our outdoor shoes with cotton covers: I really hope that this was to further the preservation efforts and not just to make me look even more like a prat!

The entrance to the pavilion and most of the ground floor is dedicated to the record of the excavation, restoration and reassembly of the boat discovered in 1954.

I really get the feeling that Khufu didn’t want this boat to be found or stolen. The pit is nearly 100ft long covered in 41 limestone blocks each weighing 20 tons and measuring 15ft long, 6ft wide and 2 1/2ft thick. Inside the pit, the boat was in 1224 pieces. I do hope he met some decent ship builders in the afterlife!

Due to the sheer size of the thing, the best idea of how the boat actually looked is by checking out the scale model. Our guide asked if we could take a photo next to it and was given the go ahead until another “official” turned up and was almost apoplectic seeing us next to the model. The photo was worth it though, don’t you think?

The boat is housed in a climate controlled pavilion on three levels (ground floor, 1st floor and 2nd floor) directly over the site at which it was discovered. It is over 140ft long and nearly 20ft wide and due to the proximity of the viewing galleries, is very difficult to take a “full” photo of.
Here’s the underside of the boat from the 1st floor…

…and the top of the boat from the 2nd floor.